International Baccalaureate

In over 2,000 schools around the world, the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program offers an academically challenging, educationally balanced program with final examinations which are externally assessed by an international board of examiners.


Brief Description of the IB Program

Created in 1968, the International Baccalaureate Organization's Diploma Program is designed for students planning to attend university and is a rigorous academic program for highly motivated students. It allows access to university programs throughout the world and utilizes a standardized evaluation system which is applied worldwide.

This program is a comprehensive and rigorous two-year curriculum for juniors and seniors, leading to IB examinations. The IB Diploma Program is a challenging program and universities around the world recognize its value and academic depth, breadth, and rigor. IB works to develop student character along with his/her academic excellence. Hence, IB has become recognized as one of the strongest educational experiences available in secondary education today.

The IB Diploma Program offers a sophisticated curriculum aimed at students aged 16 to 19, presented over the last two years of High School in grades 11 and 12. Students choosing the IB Diploma program take all courses at the IB level. Students choosing IB Certificates take one, two or three courses at the IB level and complete their schedule with American Diploma courses.

Group I Courses - Studies in Language and Literature

Group 1 - Studies in Languages and Literature

  • Language A: Literature - English
  • Language A: Language and Literature - English & Arabic


It is a requirement of the programme that students study at least one subject from Group 1.

In Group 1, students will study literature, including selections of literature in translation, and may choose to combine this with language, depending on their choice of course. Students will choose to study their group 1 subject(s) in a language in which they are academically competent.

In studying the Group 1 courses, students are able to develop:

• a personal appreciation of language and literature

• skills in literary criticism

• an understanding of the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts

• strong powers of expression, both written and oral

• an appreciation of cultural differences in perspective

The range of texts studied in Language A courses is broad, and students grow to appreciate a language’s complexity, wealth and subtleties in a variety of contexts. A specific aim is to engender a lifelong interest in literature and a love for the elegance and richness of human expression.

Language A: Literature (SL/HL)

The Language A: Literature course introduces students to the analysis of literary texts. It is the course, which is delivered in many mother tongues, and may be studied in any language with a sufficiently developed written literature.

The course is organized into four parts, each focused on a group of literary works. Together, the four parts of the course add up to a comprehensive exploration of literature from a variety of cultures, genres and periods. Students learn to appreciate the artistry of literature, and develop the ability to reflect critically on their reading, presenting literary analysis powerfully through both oral and written communication.

Key features of the curriculum and assessment models

* Available at higher and standard levels

* Higher level study requires a minimum of 240 class hours, while standard level study requires a minimum of 150 class hours

* Students study 13 works at higher level and 10 works at standard level from a representative selection of genres, periods and places

* Students develop the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of literary works, building understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism

* The study of literary works in context is emphasized, and through the study of literature in translation the student is challenged to reflect on the role of cultural assumptions in interpretation

* Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written coursework and oral activities

* The formal examination comprises two essay papers, one requiring the analysis of a passage of unseen literary text, and the other a response to a question based on the works studied

* Students also produce a written assignment based on the works studied in translation, and perform two oral activities presenting their analysis of works read

Language A: Language and Literature (SL/HL)

The Language A: Language and Literature course introduces the critical study and interpretation of written and spoken texts from a wide range of literary and non-literary genres. The formal analysis of texts is supplemented by awareness that meaning is not fixed but can change in respect to contexts of production and consumption.

The course is organized into four parts, each focused on the study of either literary or non-literary texts. Together, the four parts of the course allow the student to explore the Language A in question through its cultural development and use, its media forms and functions, and its literature. Students develop skills of literary and textual analysis, and also the ability to present their ideas effectively. A key aim is the development of critical literacy.

Key features of the curriculum and assessment models

* Available at higher and standard levels

* Higher level study requires a minimum of 240 class hours, while standard level study requires a minimum of 150 class hours

* Students study 6 works at higher level and 4 works at standard level from a representative selection of genres, periods and places

* Students develop the techniques needed for the critical analysis of communication, becoming alert to interactions between text, audience and purpose

* An understanding of how language, culture and context determine the construction of meaning is developed through the exploration of a wide variety of texts, some of which are studied in translation

* Students are assessed through a combination of formal examinations, written coursework and oral activities

* The formal examination comprises two essay papers, one requiring the analysis of unseen literary and non-literary texts, and the other a response to a question based on the literary works studied

* Students also produce written tasks in a variety of genres, and perform two oral activities presenting their analysis of works read

Group II Courses - Language Acquisition

Group 2 - Language Acquisition

It is a requirement of the programme that students study at least one subject from group 2.

The main emphasis of the modern language courses is on the acquisition and use of language in a range of contexts and for different purposes while, at the same time, promoting an understanding of another culture through the study of its language.

Modern Languages

French or Spanish ab initio: These courses are for beginners (that is, students who have little or no previous experience of learning the language they have chosen). These courses are only available at standard level.

French B, Arabic B, or Spanish B: These courses are intended for students who have had some experience of learning the language (from four to six years). They may be studied at either higher level or standard level.


Group III - Individuals and societies

Group 3 - Individuals and societies

Students are required to choose one subject from each of the six academic areas, including one from Individuals and societies. They can choose a second subject from each academic area except the arts.

Subjects available:

Business management

The course covers the key characteristics of business organization and environment and the business functions of human resource management, finance and accounts, marketing and operations management. Links between the topics are central to the course. Through the exploration of six underpinning concepts (change, culture, ethics, globalization, innovation and strategy), the course allows students to develop a holistic understanding of today’s complex and dynamic business environment. The conceptual learning is firmly anchored in business management theories, tools and techniques and placed in the context of real world examples and case studies.

Economics

The course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum—rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

Psychology

The IB Diploma Program psychology course is the systematic study of behavior and mental processes. Since the psychology course examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behavior, it is well placed in group 3, individuals and societies. Students undertaking the course can expect to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied. This will allow them to have a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behavior.

Global Politics

The IB Diploma Program global politics course is an exciting addition to group three. The course explores fundamental political concepts such as power, liberty and equality, in a range of contexts and at a variety of levels. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international and global dimensions of political activity, as well as allowing them the opportunity to explore political issues affecting their own lives.

Group IV - Sciences

Group 4 - Sciences

It is a requirement of the program that students study at least one subject from group 4.

Through studying science, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. In all of the group 4 subjects there is an emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work.

Past experience shows that students will be able to study a group 4 subject at standard level (SL) successfully with no background in, or previous knowledge of science. An IB students’ approach to study should be characterized by the specific IB learner profile attributes – inquirers, thinkers and communicators.

The courses are organized by topics, with SL students having to study eleven topics and higher level (HL) students having to investigate nine of these topics to a greater depth. Both SL and HL students are responsible for covering two of seven option topics.

The power of scientific knowledge to transform societies is unparalleled. It has the potential to produce great universal benefits or to reinforce inequalities and cause harm to people and the environment. In line with the IB mission statement, group 4 students need to be aware of the moral responsibility of scientists to ensure that scientific knowledge and data are available to all countries on an equitable basis and that they have the scientific capacity to use this for developing sustainable societies.

Subjects available:

Biology

  • Available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL)

Chemistry

  • Available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL)

Physics

  • Available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL)

Computer Science

  • Computer science previously formed an option in group 5 of the Diploma Program curriculum but now lies within group 4. As such, it is regarded as an experimental science, alongside biology, chemistry and physics. This group change is significant as it means DP students can now select computer science as their group 4 subject rather than having to select it in addition to mathematics as was previously the case.


Group V - Mathematics

Group 5 - Mathematics

It is a requirement of the program that students study at least one course in mathematics.

Mathematics HL - This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

Mathematics SL - This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. It is expected that the majority of these students will need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration.

Mathematical Studies SL - This is a standard level course taught at the same standard as the mathematics SL course. It is designed for students with varied mathematical backgrounds and abilities. Students taking this course are well prepared for a career in social sciences, humanities, languages or arts. These students may need to utilize the statistics and logical reasoning that they have learned as part of the mathematical studies course in their future studies. Mathematical studies SL has an emphasis on applications of mathematics. It includes an individual project, an extended piece of work based on personal research, involving the collection, analysis and evaluation of data.

Group VI - The Arts

Group 6 - The Arts

It is a requirement of the program that students choose one subject from each of the academic areas 1 – 5.

The subject in group 6 allows a high degree of adaptability to different cultural contexts. The emphasis is on creativity in the context of disciplined, practical research into the relevant genres.

In addition, each subject is designed to foster critical, reflective and informed practice, help students understand the dynamic and changing nature of the arts, explore the diversity of arts across time, place and cultures, and express themselves with confidence and competence.

IB Visual Art - is available to students at higher level or standard level.

High School IB Test Results May 2017

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OUR IB STUDENTS AT AIS!

This year, AIS percentage awarded IBD was once again 100% and the World percentage was 78.40%.

AIS average points obtained by candidates who passed the diploma was 33.26 and the world average 29.95.

AIS grade obtained by candidates who passed the diploma was 5.26 and the world average 4.8.


  • American International School in Egypt - Main Campus
  • 5th Settlement, Cairo Festival City - South of the Police Academy, Kattameya, Cairo, Egypt

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With a heritage of excellence spanning 25 years, American International School in Egypt (AIS) - Main Campus serves over 1,500 students. Providing a holistic approach to education that encourages academic achievements, AIS develops students that will thrive in a multicultural society. An Esol Education school, AIS is part of a network of exceptional international schools around the world in locations such as Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Cairo, Nicosia, and Lebanon.

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